Forex Analyser includes 25 forex trading indicators for technical analysis of trading instruments.
Each trading indicator and condition can be set on/off. Indicator values can be adjusted.
Trading indicators can be used alone or combined with candlestick patterns to give you trading signal alerts when those switched on agree.
You may also set Forex Analyser to fully automated to place and manage a trade when there is a trading signal.
E.g. When Stochastics is over sold and trending up, CCI is also oversold, price is above Moving Average - signal alert and/or place trade.

1. Indicators set on/off

Set the indicators and conditions required.

2. Chart Analysis

Forex Analyser analyses charts for indicator signals.

3. Signal Alert

Forex Analyser will alert you when there is a trading signal and/or place and manage trade.

Moving Average Convergence/Divergence (MACD)

The MACD is another popular tool many traders use. The calculation behind the MACD is fairly simple. Essentially, it calculates the difference between a currency's 26-day and 12-day exponential moving averages (EMA). The 12-day EMA is the faster one, while the 26-day is a slower moving average. The calculation of both EMAs uses the closing prices of whatever period is measured. On the MACD chart, a nine-day EMA of MACD itself is plotted as well, and it acts as a signal for buy and sell decisions. The MACD generates a bullish signal when it moves above its own nine-day EMA, and it sends a sell sign when it moves below its nine-day EMA.

The MACD histogram provides a visual depiction of the difference between MACD and its nine-day EMA. The histogram is positive when MACD is above its nine-day EMA and negative when MACD is below its nine-day EMA. If prices are in an uptrend, the histogram grows bigger as the prices start to rise faster, and contracts as price movement begins to slow down. The same principle works in reverse as prices are falling.

Moving Average

A widely used indicator in technical analysis that helps smooth out price action by filtering out the "noise" from random price fluctuations. A moving average (MA) is a trend-following or lagging indicator because it is based on past prices. The two basic and commonly used MAs are the simple moving average (SMA), which is the simple average of a security over a defined number of time periods, and the exponential moving average (EMA), which gives bigger weight to more recent prices. The most common applications of MAs are to identify the trend direction and to determine support and resistance levels. While MAs are useful enough on their own, they also form the basis for other indicators such as the Moving Average Convergence Divergence (MACD).

Envelopes

A type of technical indicator typically formed by two moving averages that define upper and lower price range levels. An envelope is a technical indicator used by investors and traders to help identify extreme overbought and oversold conditions in a market. The envelopes, which typically appear overlaid on a price chart, are also useful in identifying trading ranges for a particular trading instrument.

A moving average envelope calculates two moving averages using the high price and low price inputs. Both averages are calculated using price data from the same number of bars, as determined by the input length. The average of the high price is increased by a user-specified percent and then plotted; the average of the low price is reduced by a user-specified percentage and then plotted. The envelope inputs can be customized to suit each investor's or trader's style and preferences.

Stochastic Oscillator

A technical momentum indicator that compares a security's closing price to its price range over a given time period. The oscillator's sensitivity to market movements can be reduced by adjusting the time period or by taking a moving average of the result.

The theory behind this indicator is that in an upward-trending market, prices tend to close near their high, and during a downward-trending market, prices tend to close near their low. Transaction signals occur when the %K crosses through a three-period moving average called the "%D".

Average Directional Index (ADX)

An indicator used in technical analysis as an objective value for the strength of trend. ADX is non-directional so it will quantify a trend's strength regardless of whether it is up or down. ADX is usually plotted in a chart window along with two lines known as the DMI (Directional Movement Indicators). ADX is derived from the relationship of the DMI lines.

Analysis of ADX is a method of evaluating trend and can help traders to choose the strongest trends and also how to let profits run when the trend is strong.

Parabolic SAR

A technical analysis strategy that uses a trailing stop and reverse method called "SAR," or stop-and-reversal, to determine good exit and entry points.

This method was developed by J. Wells Wilder. Basically, if the stock is trading below the parabolic SAR (PSAR) you should sell. If the stock price is above the SAR then you should buy (or stay long).

Alligator

Bill Williams introduced the Alligator indicator in 1995. The Alligator is as much a metaphor as it is an indicator. It consists of three lines, overlaid on a pricing chart, that represent the jaw, the teeth and the lips of the beast, and was created to help the trader confirm the presence of a trend and its direction. The Alligator indicator can also help traders designate impulse and corrective wave formations, but the tool works best when combined with a momentum indicator.

The "traits" of the Alligator are numerous. If the three lines are entwined, then the Alligator's mouth is closed and he is said to be sleeping. As he sleeps, he gets hungrier by the minute, waiting for a breakout from his slumber when he will eat. When the trend takes shape, the Alligator wakes and starts eating. Once satiated, the Alligator closes his mouth once again and goes to sleep.

Bollinger Bands

A band plotted two standard deviations away from a simple moving average, developed by famous technical trader John Bollinger.

Because standard deviation is a measure of volatility, Bollinger Bands adjust themselves to the market conditions. When the markets become more volatile, the bands widen (move further away from the average), and during less volatile periods, the bands contract (move closer to the average). The tightening of the bands is often used by technical traders as an early indication that the volatility is about to increase sharply.

This is one of the most popular technical analysis techniques. The closer the prices move to the upper band, the more overbought the market, and the closer the prices move to the lower band, the more oversold the market.

Average True Range (ATR)

A measure of volatility introduced by Welles Wilder in his book: New Concepts in Technical Trading Systems.

The true range indicator is the greatest of the following:
-current high less the current low.
-the absolute value of the current high less the previous close.
-the absolute value of the current low less the previous close.

The average true range is a moving average (generally 14-days) of the true ranges.

Simply put, a higher level of volatility will have a higher ATR, and a lower level of volatility will have a lower ATR.

Relative Strength Index (RSI)

A technical momentum indicator that compares the magnitude of recent gains to recent losses in an attempt to determine overbought and oversold conditions of an asset.

The RSI ranges from 0 to 100. An asset is deemed to be overbought once the RSI approaches the 70 level, meaning that it may be getting overvalued and is a good candidate for a pullback. Likewise, if the RSI approaches 30, it is an indication that the asset may be getting oversold and therefore likely to become undervalued.

Commodity Channel Index (CCI)

An oscillator used in technical analysis to help determine when an investment vehicle has been overbought and oversold. The Commodity Channel Index, first developed by Donald Lambert, quantifies the relationship between the asset's price, a moving average (MA) of the asset's price, and normal deviations (D) from that average.

The CCI, when used in conjunction with other oscillators, can be a valuable tool to identify potential peaks and valleys in the asset's price, and thus provide investors with reasonable evidence to estimate changes in the direction of price movement of the asset.

Standard Deviation

Standard deviation is an indicator that measures the size of an asset's recent price moves in order to predict how volatile the price may be in the future.

It can help you decide whether volatility is likely to increase or decrease. A very high standard deviation reading indicates that a huge price change has just occurred, but that a decrease in volatility could soon follow. A very low standard deviation reading indicates the opposite.

Ichimoku Kinko Hyo

A technical indicator that is used to gauge momentum along with future areas of support and resistance. The Ichimoku indicator is comprised of five lines called the tenkan-sen, kijun-sen, senkou span A, senkou span B and chickou span. This indicator was developed so that a trader can gauge an asset's trend, momentum and support and resistance points without the need of any other technical indicator.

Momentum

The rate of acceleration of a security's price or volume. The idea of momentum in securities is that their price is more likely to keep moving in the same direction than to change directions. In technical analysis, momentum is considered an oscillator and is used to help identify trendlines.

Once a momentum trader sees acceleration in a stock's price, earnings or revenues, the trader will often take a long or short position in the stock in the hope that its momentum will continue in either an upward or downward direction.

Bears Power

Everyday trading represents a battle of buyers ("Bulls") pushing prices up and sellers ("Bears") pushing prices down. Depending on what party scores off, the day will end with a price that is higher or lower than that of the previous day. Intermediate results, first of all the highest and lowest price, allow to judge about how the battle was developing during the day.

It is very important to be able to estimate the Bears Power balance since changes in this balance initially signalize about possible trend reversal. This task can be solved using the Bears Power oscillator developed by Alexander Elder and and described in his book titled Trading for a Living.

Bulls Power

Everyday trading represents a battle of buyers ("Bulls") pushing prices up and sellers ("Bears") pushing prices down. Depending on what party scores off, the day will end with a price that is higher or lower than that of the previous day. Intermediate results, first of all the highest and lowest price, allow to judge about how the battle was developing during the day.

It is very important to be able to estimate the Bulls Power balance since changes in this balance initially signalize about possible trend reversal. This task can be solved using the Bulls Power oscillator developed by Alexander Elder and and described in his book titled Trading for a Living.

DeMarker

An indicator used in technical analysis that compares the most recent price action to the previous period's price in an attempt to measure the demand of the underlying asset. This indicator is generally used to identify price exhaustion and can also be used to identify market tops and bottoms. This oscillator is bounded between -100 and +100 and, unlike many other oscillators, it does not use smoothed data.

Technical traders primarily use this indicator as a method of identifying the riskiness of the levels in which they wish to place a transaction. Generally, values above 60 are indicative of lower volatility and risk, while a reading below 40 is a sign that risk is increasing.

Force Index

The Force Index is an oscillator that fluctuates above and below zero. It combines price movement and volume to assess the force behind price movements and spot potential trend changes.

The 13-period Force Index confirms short-term uptrends when above zero, and confirms short-term downtrends when below zero. When the Force Index Diverges with price, it indicates a trend change may be coming.

Moving Average Of Oscillator

OsMA is used in technical analysis to represent the variance between an oscillator from its moving average, over a given period of time. Typically the primary line of the MACD will serve as the oscillator, with the signal line of the MACD then acting as the moving average. The OsMA relationship is one of the most fundamental in technical analysis.

The oscillator is a useful indicator of trend and relationship between data, which can signal when a security may be overbought or oversold, due to results of price and/or volume oscillators.

Relative Vigor Index

An indicator used in technical analysis that measures the conviction of a recent price action and the likelihood that it will continue. The RVI compares the positioning of a security's closing price relative to its price range, and the result is smoothed by calculating an exponential moving average of the values.

The RVI indicator is calculated in a similar fashion to the stochastic oscillator, but the vigor index compares the close relative to the open rather than to the low. Traders expect the RVI value to grow as the bullish trend gains momentum because in this type of environment, a security's closing price tends to be at the top of the range while the open is near the low of the day.

Williams Percent Range

The Williams %R oscillator, developed by noted technical analyst Larry Williams, is a momentum indicator similar to the stochastic oscillator. This indicator is primarily used to identify overbought or oversold conditions in a market and to note divergence of momentum from price.

The Williams %R technical indicator is used to provide a number of different trading signals. In range-bound markets, traders typically buy long on bullish divergence or when the indicator shows oversold conditions in the market. Conversely, traders sell short when there is bearish divergence from price or when the indicator shows overbought conditions. In trending markets, traders look to buy when the indicator shows oversold levels or when the indicator reading is above a reading of -50. Selling short is indicated in a downtrend when the %R readings are lower than -50 or when the oscillator shows overbought price levels.

Volumes

The number of shares or contracts traded in a security or an entire market during a given period of time. It is simply the amount of shares that trade hands from sellers to buyers as a measure of activity. If a buyer of a stock purchases 100 shares from a seller, then the volume for that period increases by 100 shares based on that transaction.

Volume is an important indicator in technical analysis as it is used to measure the worth of a market move. If the markets have made strong price move either up or down the perceived strength of that move depends on the volume for that period. The higher the volume during that price move the more significant the move.

Money Flow Index

A momentum indicator that uses a stock's price and volume to predict the reliability of the current trend. Because the Money Flow Index adds trading volume to the Relative Strength Index (RSI), it's sometimes referred to as volume-weighted RSI.

Awesome Oscillator

The Awesome Oscillator is an indicator used to measure market momentum. AO calculates the difference of a 34 Period and 5 Period Simple Moving Averages. The Simple Moving Averages that are used are not calculated using closing price but rather each bar's midpoints. AO is generally used to affirm trends or to anticipate possible reversals.

Because of its nature as an oscillator, The Awesome Oscillator is designed to have values that fluctuate above and below a Zero Line. The generated values are plotted as a histogram of red and green bars. A bar is green when its value is higher than the previous bar. A red bar indicates that a bar is lower than the previous bar. When AO's values are above the Zero Line, this indicates that the short term period is trending higher than the long term period. When AO's values are below the Zero Line, the short term period is trending lower than the Llnger term period. This information can be used for a variety of signals.

Accelerator Oscillator

Acceleration/Deceleration Technical Indicator (AC) measures acceleration and deceleration of the current driving force. This indicator will change direction before any changes in the driving force, which, it its turn, will change its direction before the price. If you realize that Acceleration/Deceleration is a signal of an earlier warning, it gives you evident advantages.

The nought line is basically the spot where the driving force is at balance with the acceleration. If Acceleration/Deceleration is higher than nought, then it is usually easier for the acceleration to continue the upward movement (and vice versa in cases when it is below nought). Unlike in case with Awesome Oscillator, it is not regarded as a signal when the nought line is crossed. The only thing that needs to be done to control the market and make decisions is to watch for changes in color. To save yourself serious reflections, you must remember: you can not buy with the help of Acceleration/Deceleration, when the current column is colored red, and you can not sell, when the current column is colored green.

If you enter the market in the direction of the driving force (the indicator is higher than nought, when buying, or it is lower than nought, when selling), then you need only two green columns to buy (two red columns to sell). If the driving force is directed against the position to be opened (indicator below nought for buying, or higher than nought for selling), a confirmation is needed, hence, an additional column is required. In this case the indicator is to show three red columns over the nought line for a short position and three green columns below the nought line for a long position.